Faeries likes and dislikes

You do not have to believe in faeries. You must be willing to objectively see what’s going on around you, but you don’t have to believe.

The faeries are real, whether you believe in them or not. They won’t stay where they’re ignored or ridiculed, but they are very, very real.

I fully realize how odd it sounds, to say that I see faeries and interact with them. I mean, I would never mention this in conversation at a corporate cocktail party, and expect to be taken seriously!

However, I really do see them, and others do too, regardless of how they explain them. Even complete skeptics notice the flitting lights and shadows in our home, and often ask what they are. Sometimes I say, “I don’t know,” which is true. At other times, I’ll admit, “We think they’re faeries.”

Regardless of the explanation, the visitor will usually comment that he/she is still seeing these odd little things, later.

So, if you raise an eyebrow as you read this, it’s okay. I know that, whether or not you believe in them, you will see them if they’re nearby.

It will take an open mind to accept their reality.

How to attract faeries

How do you attract faeries? Like other beings, faeries have their own likes and dislikes. It’s difficult to say, “Oh, this will definitely work,” because they’re just like you and me in that respect.

We have our own reasons for going places.

For example, I love libraries but if the librarians are snooty, I won’t go back a second time.

So, if you don’t let the faeries know that you are aware of them and appreciate them, they may not return.

Here are common likes (and dislikes) of faeries:

Likes:

  • Tidiness, order, and cleanliness, especially in the kitchen
  • Bread and cake – little bits set out in the evening
  • Something that clearly invites them. The faerie door is a good example.
  • Milk or water, set out in the evening, perhaps in a nice thimble (but not one made of iron or steel)
  • Glittery and shiny things – small bells, marbles, jewelry (no iron or steel)
  • Music – light, happy music, even singing in the shower can help
  • Low lighting – they are most often seen at dusk and dawn, but a small candle (electric is okay) can guide them to your home

Dislikes:

  • Iron things. Especially scissors left out in plain view. Pins, knives, anything made of iron will frighten them, sometimes.
  • Clutter, disorder, stacks of things that haven’t been sorted, and so on
  • Bells. I know that some faeries like bells, but they are their own bells. If your cat wears a bell, or you have a very rude alarm clock, or something like that, the noise may drive away the faeries.
  • Water. Many “psychic” experiences are attributed to a deep, hidden stream under a building. Some faeries are the opposite: They don’t like to cross a stream, hidden or visible. (Then again, we have plenty of faeries who live in or near the water, so this isn’t a firm rule.)
  • Looking them in the eye. It is said that you can gain control over a faerie, especially a Leprechaun, if you look him/her straight in the eye and hold that gaze.

Forest illustration by Timo Balk
Used with permission.

206 thoughts on “Faeries likes and dislikes”

  1. I loved this and so did my best friend we are 16 and thought of this very clever. We were wondering if it is possible that if you were nod born a fairie if you could become one

  2. Sorry but I disagree just because you can’t see something doesn’t mean that it isn’t there . I can talk from first hand experience that fairies are real and saying that you don’t believe effects their health . My great great grandfather was a german n√ęck fea and that blood was passed down to me so saying that offends me. Also his name was saint Nichols and he was german too .he delivered presents a long long time ago and then he just grew old and passed away. So ya they are all real wether you like it or not.

    1. Rachael, I’m sorry that you were offended by something said here, but I try to approve most comments, whether I agree with them or not.

      Speaking of that: I’m not convinced that simply saying you don’t believe affects the health of a faerie.

      It was a charming bit of fiction in Peter Pan when, to restore Tinker Bell’s strength, people were asked to say they did believe in faeries.

      No two people will share the same exact opinions about faeries; sooner or later they’ll encounter differences. In some cases, that’s due to cultural context – nearly all faerie lore is similar in many ways, but there are distinct differences between, say, Native American faerie lore and Asian faerie lore.

      And, if someone visits this website just to insist that faeries aren’t real, I usually wonder whether they’re trying to convince themselves more than us.

      I approve some unkind comments, simply to remind people that – even at this website – opinions can vary, widely. I discard about 95% of snarky comments, on both sides of the argument. I want this site to be realistic about faeries – both the sweet, gentle ones, and the mischievous, difficult ones. And, for me, part of the realism is remaining aware of public beliefs and blatant misunderstandings about faeries, and responding to comments as best I can.

      Sincerely, Fiona

  3. One more thing to G one thing that really offends faeries is being called a demon so sorry. Also not everything is evil

    1. Rachael, assuming you were replying to a 2010 comment: G wasn’t saying that faeries are demonic. He (or she) was concerned about his experiences, and whether he should be concerned. I doubt that he thought faeries are demons. The problem is, demons seem to mimic many things. Though paranormal researchers most often find them mimicking ghosts, there’s no reason to assume that a demon couldn’t mimic what we consider faerie characteristics.

      And then there are the faeries in the Unseelie Court, and they might easily be confused with something bordering on evil; sometimes, they do very not-nice things. Remember, until around Shakespeare’s time, people had so many unpleasant – and sometimes frightening – encounters with faeries, they assumed that all of them were malicious. Puck’s closing monologue in “A Midsummer Night’s Dream” helped change those attitudes.

      Sincerely, Fiona

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